Tassajara warm red cabbage salad with sunflower seeds and raisins

July 2, 2016 at 2:56 pm (101 cookbooks, B_, Cruciferous rich, Other, Quick weeknight recipe, Spring recipes, Winter recipes)


I’m trying to get more “purple” in, and wanted to use red cabbage, but never know what to do with it. I tried this Tassajara warm red cabbage recipe by way of 101cookbooks. Heidi says her version is less cheesy, less fruity, and less rich, but it still tasted plenty cheesy, fruity, and rich to us. Both Derek and I enjoyed it.

I served the cabbage on top of mache (green!), grated carrots (orange!) and leftover basmati rice (made with saffron, cardamom, cloves, cinnamon).  I quite liked it with warm, sweet spices in the basmati rice. Next time I might even add some to the cabbage itself.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup sunflower seeds (can be reduced, see note below)
  • 1 teaspoon natural cane sugar (or brown sugar)
  • fine grain sea salt
  • 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 red onion, diced
  • 3 medium cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 pound head of red cabbage or radicchio, quartered and cut into thin ribbons
  • 1 tsp. fresh rosemary, minced
  • 2 ounces golden raisins (or other plump, chopped dried fruit)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2 ounces feta cheese, crumbled
  • a bit of freshly grated Parmesan cheese, to garnish (I omitted this)

Instructions:

  1. Roast the sunflower seeds in a dry skillet over medium heat until golden brown. Sprinkle on the sugar, and a couple pinches of salt. Stir until the sugar melts and coats the seeds (your pan will need to be hot enough). Transfer the seeds immediately to a plate so they don’t stick to the pan. Set aside.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet and saute the onion for a minute or two with a couple pinches of salt. Stir in the garlic, and the cabbage, and a few more pinches of salt. Stir and cook for just a minute or so, or until the cabbage softens up just a touch. Then stir in the rosemary, most of the raisins, and the vinegar. The cabbage will continue to get more and more tender even after you remove it from the heat, so keep that in mind, and do your best to avoid overcooking it — you don’t want it to collapse entirely.
  3. Fold in half of the feta cheese, most of the sunflower seeds, then taste. Season with more salt if needed. Serve garnished with the remaining raisins, feta, sunflower seeds, and Parmesan cheese.

Serves 4 to 6.

My notes:

I made this a second time and we liked it even more than the first time. It’s definitely a good recipe to have on hand when you have leftover red cabbage.  I’d also like to try it with radicchio.

Both times I made this I didn’t use up all the sunflower seeds. The leftovers were tasty on other dishes, but I think the amount could definitely be reduced. Maybe 1/3 of a cup?

This recipe already has red cabbage and red onions, but for even more purple it may be fun to use prunes for the dried fruit. Or dried currants. Or a mix. An idea for next time.

The first time I made this Alma just picked out the raisins and feta and ignored the rest. I omitted the sunflower seeds from her dish as I wasn’t sure if they were a choking hazard. The second time I made the dish I cut up the cabbage into small pieces and I ground the sunflower seeds and sprinkled them on top of her cabbage. She seemed to enjoy the dish. I’ll wait to see what happens next time before declaring it toddler approved.

This recipe doesn’t have much protein (only a little from the feta and sunflower seeds). I would recommend serving it with a lentil soup or dal. I don’t have a specific recommendation yet. Does anyone have any ideas?

 

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