Five-Grain Croquettes

December 24, 2007 at 7:09 pm (B plus, Grains, Peter Berley)


Based on a recipe from Peter Berley’s The Modern Vegetarian Kitchen. These croquettes don’t have any herbs or spices, but they’re not at all bland. The sauteed vegetables remind me a bit of stuffing, but the croquettes have a fresh, simple flavor of their own.

Combine in a 3-quart saucepan over high heat:

  • 1/2 cup white rice (sushi or jasmine or arborio are all fine)
  • 2 Tbs. amaranth
  • 2 Tbs. teff
  • 2 Tbs. quinoa
  • 2 Tbs. millet
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2.5 cups water

Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes, or until all of the water is absorbed. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

While the grains cook, warm in a medium skillet:

  • 2 Tbs olive oil (This amount can be reduced if you want.  You just need enough oil so that the vegetables brown.)

Add and cook on medium-low for 8-10 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking:

  • 1 cup minced onion
  • 1/2 cup finely diced fresh or dried red bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup finely diced celery
  • 1/4 tsp. freshly milled black pepper
  • 3/4 tsp. salt

Reduce the heat to low, cover, and continue cooking for 10 to 15 minutes, until the vegetables are very tender and slightly caramelized. You may need to add a tablespoon or two of water if they begin to burn. Lightly oil a large baking sheet (or two if you only have small sheets).

When the grains are done, add the vegetables to the grains and mix thoroughly. Set the mixture aside until it is cool enough to handle. If you’re in a hurry move it to a larger bowl or a tray for cooling.

Form the mixture into croquettes the size of golf balls. Place them 1 inch apart on the baking sheet and flatten slightly with the palm of your hand. Bake for 20 minutes.

Should make about 18-24? golf-ball sized croquettes, or if you prefer make 12-16? larger croquettes and fit them all on one tray.

Makes 4 main-dish servings if you have two sides.\

My notes:

If you don’t have amaranth, teff, quinoa, or millet, just substitute a little more of the other grains that you do have. I rarely have teff, so add extra amaranth, because I think it provides an excellent flavor to the croquettes.  Even when I do have all the grains, I sometimes add more amaranth because it’s so tasty.

Berley serves these croquettes with a carrot sauce, but his recipe wasn’t great. I like them by themselves, or with a potent salsa verde.

I’ve made this recipe many time with dehyrdrated red bell peppers from Penzey’s.  I just rehydrate them in some water before adding them in with the other veggies.  I think I might even like the dehydrated peppers more than the fresh ones in this dish.  Since the dried peppers are so tasty, sundried tomatoes might be a nice addition as well.

Every time I make this recipe I love it, but no one else seems very excited about them.  Derek will eat them, but only grudgingly.  My sister Hanaleah didn’t care for them.  I don’t know why I’m such an outlier.  Is it that no one else likes the taste of amaranth?

Rating: B+ (I would actually give this recipe an A- if anyone else actually liked it)

Derek: B-/C

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6 Comments

  1. Shyaporn said,

    This recipe is from the Angelica Kitchen Cookbook, including the carrot-thyme-leek glaze. It’s great.

  2. captious said,

    Well I got the recipe from Modern Vegetarian Kitchen, but it’s definitely possible that the original recipe was from the Angelica Kitchen cookbook. I’m glad to know that someone else likes the recipe!

  3. What I’ve been eating lately « The captious vegetarian said,

    […] it ahead of time and then reheating it, and it came out kind of dried out and tough.  I also made five-grain croquettes, except instead of teff I used extra amaranth and instead of millet I used pre-cooked hulled […]

  4. Broccoli cheddar quinoa bites | The captious vegetarian said,

    […] half of a cup of broccoli  Derek and I both liked these bites. They reminded me a little of the five-grain croquettes I used to make. Except that this recipe uses cheese and egg as a binder, whereas that one uses very […]

  5. Toddler-approved Quinoa Spinach Croquettes | The captious vegetarian said,

    […] Last month I made broccoli cheddar quinoa bites, and liked them. So I decided to try this recipe for “Quinoa quiche muffins with spinach and cheese.” Although they are called muffins, the recipe is actually quite similar to the previous recipe, except that it calls for spinach instead of broccoli, has more eggs, and uses feta in addition to cheddar. Like before, I made them on a cookie sheet instead of in a muffin tin, to save on cleanup time. Although they are called “quiche muffins,” the way I made them they didn’t have the texture of a typical quiche or of a typical muffin. The texture is more grainy and crumbly, similar to the texture of these five-grain croquettes. […]

  6. Quinoa Spinach Croquettes | The captious vegetarian said,

    […] Last month I made broccoli cheddar quinoa bites, and liked them. So I decided to try this recipe for “Quinoa quiche muffins with spinach and cheese.” Although they are called muffins, the recipe is actually quite similar to the previous recipe, except that it calls for spinach instead of broccoli, has more eggs, and uses feta in addition to cheddar. Like before, I made them on a cookie sheet instead of in a muffin tin, to save on cleanup time. Although they are called “quiche muffins,” the way I made them they didn’t have the texture of a typical quiche or of a typical muffin. The texture is more grainy and crumbly, similar to the texture of these five-grain croquettes. […]

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